Sneaky Sasquatch, the review

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Aina Martin
@ainamartin
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When Apple Arcade was announced, it was precisely the titles like Sneaky Sasquatch that we were waiting to try on our iOS devices: original products, which without the constraint of normal market laws could have been expressed in total freedom, avoiding the much hated microtransactions that often preclude the full enjoyment of even very valid mobile games. In this Sneaky Sasquatch review we will try to explain to you how the work of RAC7 Games has found its natural habitat in Apple's subscription offer, presenting itself as a bizarre adventure seasoned with so much healthy humor but capable of showing off a non-trivial and balanced gameplay in its components.



How I pillage your campsite

The user plays the role of the mythological ape man of the title, in a decidedly not serious context, given that his main occupation is to obtain food by stealing it from visitors to the campsite adjacent to his cottage. The rangers who patrol the area do not, however, take a good look at him, and therefore our bigfoot must exploit all his skills stealth to be able to put something in the stomach every day. It opens with these simple premises a adventure much smarter than it may appear at first glance, which even manages to slip a semblance of plot to give one more justification to the protagonist's raids: the campsite in which he supplies himself with food is in fact at risk of closure, and it will be his task to recover the parts of a map that leads to an indispensable treasure to revive the fortunes of the structure.



In terms of game structure, Sneaky Sasquatch is somewhat reminiscent of Animal Crossing, both for the not huge extension of the scenario (which is subject to frequent variations) and for the division into days and the request to the user to respect a routine, "working" with the sunlight and returning home in the evening to get into bed for a good restful sleep. The classic Nintendo also comes to mind for the presence of various non-player characters with which you can interact to have access to secondary tasks: there is the bear willing to buy our excess food, the fox who rewards us with gold coins if we perform pranks (sometimes really hilarious), the duck looking for lost items and so on. Another key figure is that of the raccoon, owner of a shop that sells all upgrades useful to the bigfoot to continue in his mission, from the shovel to exhume hidden treasures up to the human disguise that allows the protagonist not to be recognized by the visitors of the campsite (with the exception of the rangers).

So Sneaky Sasquatch follows one cyclical trend, with the user having to collect food and accumulate gold coins every day of the game to be spent on equipment useful to perform new actions or reach advanced areas, and then start the process all over again. This all boils down to a gameplay however, decidedly simple to master: you move by swiping a finger on the touchscreen, while tapping on it you walk on tiptoe so as not to be heard by humans, whose state of alert in visual or auditory terms is manifested through a circular icon that is fills as they notice our presence. Then there are a whole series of contextual actions to be performed by pressing on the appropriate icons, for a title that - despite its rather short duration - does not really skimp in variety, always putting new situations on the plate. The more advanced stages of the adventure are even allowed for excursions in mingiochi and particularly successful secondary activities, for a product that is very dense in content. The humor it is also one of the driving forces of the experience, conveyed by the dialogues with the characters, by the nature of the quests and also by the funny dynamics through which the bigfoot grabs the food from the various containers and devours it, getting dirty. Sneaky Sasquatch does not miss even an audiovisual sector of all respect, with perfectly fitting music and a graphics colorful and rich in details cartoonsca, which looks good even when reproduced on Apple TV.



Comment

Tested version iPhone Digital Delivery App Store Price Free Resources4Gaming.com

8.5


Readers (1)

8.0


Your vote

Sneaky Sasquatch is a really nice surprise: behind the appearances of a toy for children there is an adventure that knows its stuff, borrows some suggestions from Animal Crossing and blends them with simple but captivating gameplay and an adorable sense of humor , for a product that amuses all round. The low level of challenge and a certain repetitiveness of the basic mechanics are minor problems in the face of a title with so many good ideas all done properly.

PRO

  • Original and ironic
  • A lot of variety in the proposed situations
  • Graphically delightful
AGAINST
  • Easy and not too long
  • Long-term repetitive basic mechanics
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